Artists

Rafaelita Aguilar Rafaelita Aguilar

Rafaelita is from Kewa/Santo Domingo Pueblo and has been creating pottery since 1953 and follows the traditional methods for creating pottery of the Aguilar family which began in the early 1900’s. Rafaelita specializes in exceptionally large pottery vessels, which are stone-polished and pit-fired. She is the aunt of Robert Aguilar.

Exhibitions: 1994, Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Arts & Crafts shows; more than 20 years exhibiting in the Santa Domingo Pueblo Arts & Craft Show.

Collections: Roger & Marilyn Peterson, Williams Bay, WI; Dr. Gregory & Angie Schaaf, Santa Fe, N.M.; Bob & Carol Berray, Santa Fe, N.M.

Publications: Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies by Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom; Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery and Directory of Artists by Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer (2000).

According to Dr. Schaaf “Rafaelita may be considered a relatively undiscovered master potter. Because she rarely entered her pots at Indian art shows, her work has not won ribbons. However, the quality of her work is commendable.” One of her favorite designs is four petal flowers as shown on the pot on the Two Raven Pottery site.

    Robert Aguilar Robert Aguilar

    Robert is from Kewa/Santo Domingo Pueblo. He has been creating pottery for more than 25 years. He is continuing the art of creating pottery and follows the traditional methods of the Aguilar family which began in the early 1900’s. He is best known for creating pottery in the classic forms and designs. His work has rich color and is beautifully polished. Collections: Janie & Paul Connor, Bob & Carol Berray, Dr. Gregory & Angie Yan Schaaf. Publications: Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies by Dr. Gregory Schaaf, see Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom.

    Earlene Antonio Earlene Antonio

    Earlene is from Acoma Pueblo and has been creating handcoiled, traditional pottery for more than 15 years. She is the daughter of Alfred and Rafaelita Romero.  It was her mother and grandmother who taught her all the fundamentals of creating handcoiled traditional pottery so she could follow in the footsteps of her ancestors. The corrugated top portion of the pot offered by Two Ravens Pottery reflects the form of pottery from nearly 1,000 years ago. Publications: Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery and Directory of Artists by Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer (2000).

    Melissa Antonio Melissa Antonio

    This very fine, hand coiled pot by Melissa Antonio, from Acoma Pueblo, is designed using simple geometric figures arranged into exceedingly complex designs. Melissa uses traditional methods of making her pottery, digs the clay herself, coils and smoothes the pot, makes her own paints, and paints the designs with a yucca brush. Her complex design are done free hand. She draws the horizontal lines and then the vertical lines and creates the patterns by filling in appropriate squares. Some call this pattern a cross-word puzzle design. She uses the term “olla” to describe this shape. A term picked up from the Spanish, olla means a water container. These shapes are patterned after the ollas used by the Acoma women in past centuries to carry water to their dwellings on the top of the mesa at Acoma. Many Acoma ollas will have a slightly concave bottom, which gave the container better balance when carried atop their heads. AWARDS: 1st, 2nd New Mexico State Fair 1992; 3rd
    New Mexico State Fair 1993; Best of Show, 1st New Mexico State Fair and 1st Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial, Gallup 1994; 1st New Mexico State Fair and 2nd Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial, Gallup 1995; 1st Eight Northern Pueblos Arts and Craft Show and 2nd, 3rd, and HM Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial, Gallup 1996; 2nd New Mexico State Fair 1997; 3rd New Mexico State Fair, 2nd Eight Northern Pueblos Arts and Craft Show 2001. EXHIBITIONS AND COLLECTIONS:  Heard Museum, City Hall, Phoenix, Eight Indian Market Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show 1994 to present, Heard Museum Show 1997 to present. PUBLICATIONS: Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies by Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Acoma & Laguna Pottery, Rick Dillingham, 1992; Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery and Directory of Artists by Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer, 2000;

      Ralph Aragon Ralph Aragon

      Ralph is a potter originally from San Felipe Pueblo. He married Joan Gachupin from the Zia Pueblo in New Mexico. Ralph brings a perspective to his work which blends his unique style with that of traditional Zia pottery. The patterns in his pottery include shields petroglyphs, and other designs he sees in nature. He has received awards at the Santa Fe Indian Market, the Gallup Ceremonial, Eight Northern Pueblos Show and the New Mexico State Fair. He signs his pottery as: R. Aragon incorporated with a Kiva step style, which is a celebration of Pueblo life and the festivities of harvest time. His works were featured at the Native Art Network show in Vicenza, Italy. Awards: Santa Fe Indian Market 1st and 2nd Places, Eight Northern Pueblos 1st Place, Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial 1st Place, and New Mexico State Fair 1st Place. Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies by Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Pueblo & Navajo Contemporary Pottery by Berger & Schiffer (2000 & 2004).

        Anna & Fidel Archuleta Anna & Fidel Archuleta

        Anna and Fidel are well known Santa Clara potters. Anna is best known for her impressive carving. The piece offered by Two Ravens Pottery is a great representation of her talent. The pot is carved with a large Avanyu serpent. The Avanyu is a water serpent and is a popular design on Santa Clara pieces. This serpent has a thin body that snakes around the body of the pot, with a small step pattern following below the body. He has a long tongue with an arrow on the tip. There are water waves under his head that are actually the end of the tail that wraps around the pot. Around the top of the pot are large whirl wind patterns. The bottom of the vase is left smooth with no carvings. The polish that covers the piece (with the exception of the deep carves) is beautiful and vibrant. It catches the light and really makes the carving stand out. Anna and Fidel gather the clay at Santa Clara Pueblo, hand coil their pieces, and use natural slips. It is signed on the bottom by Anna and Fidel.

          Ambrose Atencio Ambrose Atencio

          Ambrose was born at Santo Domingo Pueblo on June 11, 1963. He learned the art of working with clay by observing his family members and especially his grandmother. He was taught all the fundamentals of working with clay using traditional methods. He hand coils all of the pottery he creates. He gathers all his raw materials such as clay, sand, and natural plants from the land where Santo Domingo Pueblo is located. He hand cleans the clay for impurities, mixes all the natural pigments with water, and begins hand coiling his pots and bowls. Once the pottery is dry he sands the finished product to give it a smooth finish. Ambrose then begins to hand paint his beautiful designs with the stem of a yucca that has been fashioned into a brush. The colors he uses on his designs are also provided from plants such as the wild spinach plant. His designs are usually the traditional bird, flowers, or geometric designs. He sets his pottery out to dry and then fires his masterpieces the traditional way, outdoors. He signs his pottery as: Ambrose Atencio Kewa, Santo Domingo Pueblo, and the year it was constructed.

          Ambrose has won multiple awards at various venues such as the Indian Arts Northwest Market (Portland, OR); the Fountain Hills Indian Market; The Eight Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show; the Dallas Indian Arts and Crafts Fair; plus several awards at the Santa Fe Indian Market including Best of Class and Best of Category. Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007), Dr. Gregory Schaaf’s Southern Pueblo Pottery: 2000 Artist Biographies, Native People’s Magazine, and other periodicals. “Ambrose won awards in 2003 at both the Santa Fe Indian Market and the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show and 2004 at the Santa Fe Indian Market. His goal is to produce the largest hand-coiled, pit-fired and traditionally painted polychrome storage jars.” Native Peoples Magazine (Ten Other Potters to Watch).

          L. Bryant L. Bryant

          This Acoma pot offered by Two Ravens Pottery is handcoiled, handmade, and hand painted. Bryant’s fine line olla is hand-made in the traditional way that has been developed at the Acoma Pueblo over centuries. This particular olla features spectacular skill in the hand painted, fine line designs. Acoma pottery is extremely thin-walled, among the thinnest in the Southwest. This vessel is made of clay from Acoma Pueblo. Bryant is not a well known potter at this time, but does exceptional work.

            Joseph & Barbara Cerno Joseph & Barbara Cerno

            Joseph Cerno Jr. Joseph Cerno Jr.

            Joseph of Acoma Pueblo learned his pottery making skills from his well-known parents, Joseph and Barbara Cerno of Acoma Pueblo.  Haak’u or Acoma pottery has a long and rich history and is linked to their Mogollon and Mimbres ancestors of southwestern New Mexico.  The Cerno family has created some of the largest and finest traditional polychrome ollas in the Pueblo world today.  They use natural clay, mineral and vegetal paints and fire their pottery outdoors as their ancestors did.  The family has gained a reputation for their large ollas, attention to detail, beautiful high polishes and intricate designs.  Although not as well known as his parents, Joseph has demonstrated that he is well on his way to becoming a potter of renown.

            Publications: Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies by Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Southwest Art Nov. 1990; Pueblo Pottery Families by Lillian Peaster, 1997.

            Exhibitions: Poeh Museum, 2008, 53rd Annual Heard Museum Indian Fair & Market, 2011.

            Awards: 1st place Santa Fe Indian Market, 2008, 2009.

            Grace Chapella Grace Chapella

            Grace is one of the matriarchs of Hopi pottery. According to family traditions, Grace, of the Bear Clan was born February 14, 1874 at Tewa Village, Iwinge (also known as Hano). She was an active potter at age 103, about 3 years before her death in 1980. She was inducted in the Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame in 1988 in recognition of her devotion to her clan and to her culture. Her favorite designs include butterflies and moths.

            Publications: Hopi Traditions in Pottery and Painting Honoring Grace Chapella, Potter (1874- ), John E. Collins; Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies), Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery, Rick Dillingham; Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies), Dr. Gregory Schaaf .

            Collections: Grace’s beautiful work can be found at the Museum of Northern Arizona, Heard Museum in Phoenix, the Richard M. Howard collections as well as many others.

              Lee Ann Cheromiah Lee Ann Cheromiah

              Lee Ann’s designs are often from old Laguna pottery. Her mother, Evelyn, revived Laguna pottery in 1972. She taught other Laguna women to make pottery. They researched their designs at museums, as well as going to peoples’ homes getting designs off of old pottery. All lines represent rain; the red represents rain clouds, with the Kiva steps. The black on top of the diamond cross hatching are rain clouds, the cross hatching is rain, the black above the cross hatching in the corners represents the squash blossom. The design in the middle of the red with the lines and cross hatching represents a butterfly. Lee Ann’s pots are signed L.A. Cheromiah, Old Laguna, N.M. and have a Roadrunner (this is the clan that she comes from). When Lee Ann makes a pot she is always talking to the clay. She mines her own clay and grinds the sherds. Lee Ann told us that she gathers her sherds around the Laguna Pueblo which was established in 1699. She says that she gathers sherds that predate 1699, so that she has very old pots in the new pot. Publications: Acoma & Laguna Pottery by Rick Dillingham; Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies; by Gregory Schaaf; Pueblo & Navajo Contemporary Pottery by Berger & Schiffer (2000 & 2004), among others. She has been a potter for more than 30 years.

              See an article by Lee Ann at http://www.tribalexpressions.com/pottery/cheromiah.htm This article exquisitely sets forth the way in which she makes her pots. The pot/olla offered by Two Ravens Pottery is truly exceptional with regard to its design, painting, and thin walls for a pot of this size.

              Lolita Concho Lolita Concho

              Lolita who was born ca. 1910’s was among those potters who helped to revive historic Acoma pottery designs and forms in the 1970’s.  She was the mother-in-law of noted potter Dorothy Torivio and taught her the techniques for painting tight even lines. This wedding vase from Two Ravens Pottery won 1 st place at the New Mexico State Fair in 1977 and is in very good condition. 

              Awards: 1970 1st , 1976 2nd , 1978 3rd , 1980 3rd , and 1983 1st Santa Fe Indian Market.

              Collections: Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, OK; Rick Dillingham Collection; School of American Research, Santa Fe; Sunshine Studio.

              Publications: Indian Market Magazine, 1973-1988; SWAIA Quarterly Fall 1973; Fall 1976; Fall 1982; Arizona Highways May 1974; Arizona Highways Indian Arts and Crafts, Clara Tanner 1976; The Pottery of Acoma Pueblo, Rick Dillingham, 1977; American Indian Pottery, John Barry, 1984; Lost and Found Traditions: Native American Art 1965-1985, Ralph Coe, 1986; Art of Clay: Timeless Pottery of the Southwest, Lee Cohen, 1993; Acoma & Laguna Pottery, Rick Dillingham, 1992: Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies , Dr. Gregory Schaaf, 2002.

                Linda Dunlap Linda Dunlap

                Linda, from San Ildefonso Pueblo, is a daughter of noted potter Carmelita Dunlap who taught her to make pottery. Linda is a master potter with beautiful burnish work and is third in line to Maria. Two Ravens Pottery is proudly offering this beautiful bowl by Linda with a classic shape and a wonderful design. The bowl is nicely shaped and there is a feather pattern above the shoulder. Below the shoulder the bowl is painted matte near the base and has a series of clouds. It is a beautiful contrast of matte and polished surfaces. As can be seen from the photograph of the bottom of the pot, there is a strong signature.

                  Grace Medicine Flower Grace Medicine Flower

                  Grace (1938- ) is a potter from Santa Clara Pueblo. She learned her basic pottery technique from her father, Camilio Sunflower Tafoya while she was still a young woman. Grace has produced high quality bowls and vases for over 30 years. Currently she exhibits in the finest art galleries in Santa Fe, Scottsdale, Los Angeles, and other major art cities. Grace’s contributions to the art of Pueblo pottery have been the artistic precision of her traditional designs depicting the culture and symbolism of all Indians of the Southwest on black-fired pottery which has brown tones as well. Grace has been greatly honored throughout her career for her innovative work. She has been visited by Jackie Kennedy-Onassis, invited to the White House and has pieces in collections and museums around the world.

                  In the 1970’s Grace and her brother Joseph were both honored by the State of New Mexico with a medal in honor for their contribution to Santa Clara pottery. In addition to these honors, Grace has won major awards at Gallup Ceremonials and other major events. Owning one of her pieces it to own a part of the history of Santa Clara Pottery. Grace produces less than 20 pieces a year which makes her pottery very collectible.

                  Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southern Pueblo Pottery; by Gregory Schaaf; Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom.

                    B.J. Fragua B.J. Fragua

                    Betty Jean (signs B.J. Fragua) is of the Jemez Corn Clan and has been active as a potter since 1980 working with traditional polychrome and stone polished sgraffito redware and matte tanware bowls. She was taught by her famous mother, Juanita Fragua.

                    AWARDS: 1984 3rd; 1988 1st 1994 1st, 1998 2nd, Santa Fe Indian Market; Inter-tribal Ceremonial, Gallup, NM.

                    Exhibitions: 1985-present, Santa Fe Indian Market; 1997-present, Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Arts & Craft show. Galleries: Turquoise Tortosie, Sedona, AZ; Native American Collections, Inc.

                    Publications: Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom; Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies , Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery and Directory of Artists by Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer.

                      Virginia Virginia "Ponca" Fragua

                      Virginia Ponca Fragua is of the Jemez Corn Clan and has been an active potter since 1977. She signs her work V. P. Fragua, Ponca Flower. Virginia specializes in Melon bowls, Jars with Kiva steps, seed pots, wedding vases and small canteens. She digs her clay from the Jemez Reservation, uses natural paints and fires her pottery outdoors. She was taught by her mother Lenora Fragua and her cousin Laura Gachupin. Virginia is noted for her high necked vases combining highly polished redware and creamware melon and swirl forms having matte polychrome designs. The vase offered by Two Ravens Pottery incorporate her Corn Clan symbols and is a wonderful creation.

                      Awards: 2nd 1990 New Mexico State Fair; Jemez Pueblo Red Rocks Arts & Craft Show. Galleries: The Indian Craft Shop, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington, D.C.

                      Publications: Indian Market Magazine 1985, 1989; Pueblo Pottery Families by Lillian Peaster, 1997; Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery and Directory of Artists by Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer; Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies , Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                        B. D. Garcia B. D. Garcia

                        Beverly is from the Acoma Pueblo. She has been creating hand coiled, traditional Acoma pottery for more then 40 years. She has passed that tradition on to her children, Katherine Victorino and Mervin Victorino, who are also well known for their skills as Acoma potters. She creates traditionally formed shapes and uses fine line and other traditional designs on her pottery. This B.D. Garcia Olla is done in the traditional colors of black and white with her signature symbol marked on the bottom. This is a very nice sized pot in excellent condition. Her pottery is available at various galleries in the Southwest.

                          Sharon Naranjo Garcia Sharon Naranjo Garcia

                          Sharon was born in 1951 at Santa Clara Pueblo. Sharon has lived the last 30 years in Ohkay Owingeh, the Native name for San Juan Pueblo, with her husband, Peter, and their family. Sharon, a fourth generation potter, is the granddaughter of the late Christina Naranjo, one of the renowned pueblo potters in the Tafoya family. Sharon began making small animals using her grandmother’s clay. From there, she developed into a full-fledge potter. When Christina passed away in 1980, Sharon began potting full-time. She is also a great niece of Margaret Tafoya. Her specialty is blackware water jars with impressed bear paw designs and Avanyus. Garcia has been exhibiting her work and winning awards since 1988. Sharon creates carved and plain redware and blackware seed jars, water jars and vases. Her polished jars often have the traditional bear paw print. Sharon has won numerous awards at Indian Markets, she demonstrates her pottery making at museums, and her work is in collections at several museums. Two Ravens Pottery is pleased to offer this fine pot with impressed bear paws. Sharon did an excellent job of shaping, polishing and firing this piece. Awards: Best of Show Award at the Eight Northern Pueblos Shows, 2003. Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom.

                            Sheryl Garcia Sheryl Garcia

                              Angel Griego Angel Griego

                              Angel is a 14 year old Zia potter who we have included as one of Two Raven’s young potters. She was at the Indian Market in Santa Fe last August with her aunt, Eleanor Pino Griego. She is poised to follow in the footsteps of her aunt and other well-known family members in carrying on the wonderful pot making tradition of Zia Pueblo.

                              Eleanor Pino Griego Eleanor Pino Griego

                              Eleanor is from Zia Pueblo. She is one of the best known potters from Zia Pueblo and is a mentor to younger potters. She is of the Coyote/Sage Brush Clans and has been an active potter since the 1970’s working with traditional polychrome jars, bowls and vases. Ascension Galvan Pino, her grandmother, and Laura Pino, her mother, were her teachers. She is the sister of Reyes Pino and Rudy Panana.

                              Awards: Santa Fe Indian Market, Eight Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Fair, Wichita Indian Art Show, Mesa Verde Indian Art Show, and San Felipe Art Show.

                              Publications: Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom; Southern Pueblo Pottery, by Gregory Schaaf. Several prominent collectors find her work to be of the highest quality. Eleanor’s fine pottery is also available through a number of galleries. The particular pot offered by Two Ravens Pottery is nicely displayed in the photograph taken at Santa Fe Indian Market August 2010.

                              Lois Gutierrez Lois Gutierrez

                              Lois learned to make pottery from her mother, Petra Montoya Gutierrez, who had married into Santa Clara from Pojoaque. Lois makes large pieces, reinterpreting the polychrome design making. She sometimes draws Kokopelli figures, Koshare clowns, butterflies, and Pueblo scenes. Her husband Derek helps her gather her clay. He was quoted in Talking With the Clay as saying, “If you look hard enough you can find clay here and there all over the mountains, but you got to look for it. It doesn’t just jump out at you. It is beautiful when you dig in it. The white clay looks like candy, white chocolate. When you’re digging in it, you don’t want to stop, it feels so neat.” Lois has developed a very distinctive slip – by adding white to dark gold clay to make a buff colored background. Lois has said, “My favorite part is firing. When it fires good, you know that your time and hard work has been worth it.”

                              Awards : She has won over 20 awards at the Santa Fe Indian Market since 1975in a number of divisions and categories, including Best of Show and the Katherine & Miguel Otero Award for Creative Excellence.

                              Publications: Arizona Highways ; American Indian Art Magazine;, SWAIA Quarterly;, New Mexico Magazine; Pueblo Indian Pottery: 750 Artist Biographies by Gregory Schaaf; Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery by Rick Dillingham; Pueblo Pottery Families by Lillian Peaster; Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Pueblo & Navajo Contemporary Pottery by Berger & Schiffer (2000 & 2004).

                                Laurencita Herrera Laurencita Herrera

                                Cochiti (1912-1984). Laurencita was an active potter from the 1920’s to 1984. She made figures, such as the duck pitcher shown on the Two Ravens Pottery website, as well as polychrome jars, bowls, and storytellers. She is the mother of Seferina Ortiz and the great grandmother of Lisa Holt. Her pottery can be found in the Wright Collection, the Peabody Museum, Harvard University collection, the Heard Museum collection and the School of American Research. Her very collectible pieces are not readily available.

                                Publications: SWAIA Quarterly Fall 1973; Arizona Highways Indian Arts and Crafts, Clara Tanner 1976 ed., American Indian Art Magazine Spring 1983; The Pueblo Storyteller, Barbara A. Babcock 1986; Fourteen Families in Pueblo Potter, Rick Dillingham; Pueblo Pottery Families, Lillian Peaster 1997; Drooker, et al (1998); Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies, Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                Kevin Lewis Kevin Lewis

                                  Diana P. Lucero Diana P. Lucero

                                  Diana is Zia, Corn Clan, and has been creating pottery since the 1970’s. She has exhibited at Indian Market from 1997-present, Heard Museum Show, Phoenix, 1996-present, Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Art’s and Crafts show, New Mexico State Fair, Albuquerque; Annual Indian/Spanish Market, Colorado Springs, 9th Annual Indian Market & Pow Wow in 2009 presented by the Tesoro Cultural Center, Morrison, Co.

                                  Awards: 2000 2nd, traditional bowls Santa Fe Indian Market, 2nd 9th Annual Indian Market & Pow Wow. The pot featured by Two Ravens Pottery is the 2nd place winner at the Annual Pow Wow. She is proud not only of this piece, but of all the pottery that she creates, in her words, the “ancient way of pottery making…” Publications: Southern Pueblo Pottery; by Gregory Schaaf; Art Focus May 1998 and September 1999; Native Peoples, September 2000.

                                  Elizabeth Medina Elizabeth Medina

                                  Elizabeth Medina, “Sepia,” was born in 1956 into the Jemez Pueblo. She married into the Zia Pueblo. She was inspired by her Mother-in-Law, Sofia Medina, to learn the art of working with clay. Elizabeth observed Sofia with much enthusiasm in hopes of achieving the same skills. It appears from what Elizabeth has accomplished, that she has achieved her goal. Elizabeth specializes in the hand made traditional Zia pottery with traditional symbols and birds. She digs up her own clay, cleans, mixes, coils, shapes, fires, and paints her pottery the traditional way, with natural colors. Elizabeth signs her pottery as: Elizabeth Medina, Zia. Her jars with turtle lids are among her best pieces.

                                  Awards: Santa Fe Indian Market (1984, 1986, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1998, and 2000) 1st, 2nd, and 3rd at Eight Northern Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show. Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southern Pueblo Pottery; by Gregory Schaaf among others. Her work is in numerous private collections and offered in a number of well respected galleries.

                                  Santana Melchor Santana Melchor

                                  Santana from Kewa/Santo Domingo (1889-1978) was one of the most important potters of Santo Domingo in the first half of the 20th century. Some say that she was the most important Santo Domingo potter by 1945. “Through the mid 20th century into the 1970s, Santana Melchor was one of the most prolific and important Santo Domingo potters. She helped keep the earlier traditional styles and techniques alive. Her ollas are masterpieces of pueblo pottery. Even her smaller pieces are often exceptional in the quality of construction, form and design.” Dr. Gregory Schaaf.
                                  Her work is very rare and most of it is found in great collections throughout the world. It is included in the Wright Collection at Harvard’s Peabody Museum; the Heard Museum collection; the Philbrook Museum in Tulsa and in many private collections including those of Rick Dillingham, Christopher Webster, Eason Eige, and Dr. Gregory & Angie Yan Schaaf. Her work has been the subject of numerous articles and is included in publications such a: Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom; Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies; by Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery by Rick Dillingham. In the 1970’s, she was one of a group of the top Pueblo Indian potters invited to Washington to meet President Nixon and Pat.

                                    Feather Woman (Helen Naha) Feather Woman (Helen Naha)

                                    Feather Woman (1922-1993) was the matriarch in a family of well known Hopi potters. Today, her medium to larger pots typically sell for several thousand dollars. She has also been recognized by the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts for her body of work through the creation of the Helen Naha Memorial Award – For Excellence in Traditional Hopi Pottery.

                                    Awards: 1st New Mexico State Fair 1973.

                                    Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery, Rick Dillingham; Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies), Dr. Gregory Schaaf ; Thomas Varker Keam, Indian Trader, Laura Graves.

                                      Agnes Nahsonhoya Agnes Nahsonhoya

                                      Agnes is of the Bear Clan from Sichomovi Village at Second Mesa. She was born in the Snow Bird Canyon. She has been making pottery for the past 20 years. Agnes said that she learned to make pottery from her mother (Pauline Setalla), who originally learned to create beautiful Hopi pottery from her aunt Eunice Fawn Navasie. Agnes prides herself in making natural colored pottery .  Her family has been working with clay for a very long time.  Her elders, including her Mother, her aunts, Joy Navasie (Frogwoman) and Fawn Navasie, and her grandmother, Agnes Navasie taught her all the important steps of making clay into finished pottery.  She has been making Native American pottery for 18 years.  The clay she uses is found near her home.  Different colors come from clays, mustard weed for black paint which is boiled until it is like taffy, and various stones for red and white.  The clay she mainly uses produces a light peach or red color after firing.  Her coloring instruments are a matchstick end, used for a dotted effect in design, and a thin yucca brush.

                                      Awards: 1 st Hopi Show, Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ.

                                      Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery , Rick Dillingham; Hopi -Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies , Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                        Lawrence Namoki Lawrence Namoki

                                        Lawrence resides in First Mesa (Polacca), Arizona. He grew up in the village of Walpi. Lawrence is one of the finest, if not the finest, contemporary Hopi potter today. His pottery is painted with great detail. He is an important teacher of the Hopi beliefs. All of his artwork on pottery is based on Hopi Culture and Myths. He names each of his potteries. The pot offered by Two Ravens Pottery is named “Walpi”.

                                        He has been featured in Southwestern Art magazine. All colors are minerals from the earth, no paint is used. His pottery is recognized throughout the world. In 1996, two of his pots became part of the Smithsonian Institute permanent collection which again brought more fame and recognition on the international level of the art world. At this time, more of his pots are being added to the permanent collections of Museums, galleries and private collectors. His pottery can be found in numerous museums, galleries, and private collections around the world, including the Arizona State University and Oregon State University permanent collections, the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos, N.M, and in the home of one of the members of the Royal Family of England. Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies by Gregory Schaaf. Namoki has received many awards/honors for his work, including the Eight Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show’s “Governor’s Award/Best of Show” eight times and 1st place at Santa Fe Indian Market.

                                          Fannie Polacca Nampeyo Fannie Polacca Nampeyo

                                          Fannie (1904-1987) was a Hopi potter (corn clan) and is perhaps the most famous of Nampeyo of Hano’s three daughters. She made her pottery during the period when collectors were seriously collecting signed pottery. At that time, she was the oldest Nampeyo family member. She remained true to tradition in vessel construction and design throughout her career. Fannie is said to have taken a large jar of Vaseline and rubbed a little bit on her fired pot, then burnished it with an old pair of panty hose that she slipped over her hand. Her technique resulted in pottery with a beautiful patina. The pot offered by Two Ravens Pottery is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, or worn off design. This pot has a great “blush” from the fire clouds at the time of firing this piece in a kiln.

                                          Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery by Rick Dillingham; also see a wonderful publication on Hopi potters by Barbara Kramer: “Nampeyo and Her Pottery”, University of New Mexico Press (1996).

                                            Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo

                                            Priscilla (1924-2008) was a third generation descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. Her mother was Rachel Namingha Nampeyo and her grandmother was Annie Healing Nampeyo. Priscilla was also the matriarch of a family of renowned potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie. Priscilla began making pottery when she was seven years old. When she began making pottery as a youngster she did so under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. She was renowned for her classic style of pottery with beautiful forms and traditional imagery. She continued using the Sikyatki revival designs taught to her by Nampeyo and is well known for her migration patterns. She was an outstanding potter and her designs were beautifully executed. Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery by Rick Dillingham and Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007) among others.

                                              Christina Naranjo Christina Naranjo

                                              Christina (1891 – 1980) of Santa Clara Pueblo was a sister of Margaret Tafoya, Camilio Tafoya & the mother of Teresita Naranjo, Mary Cain, and Mida Tafoya. Her granddaughter, Sharon Naranjo Garcia, is an accomplished potter who follows her grandmother’s teachings. Christina is well known for her deeply carved, very traditional style of pottery which placed an emphasis on classic designs. Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery by Rick Dillingham; Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom.

                                                Nicolasa Naranjo Nicolasa Naranjo

                                                Nicolasa (1907-?) of Santa Clara Pueblo is one of the elder masters in blackware of the Naranjo Family and is mother of Roberta Naranjo. She signs her pottery “Nicolasa Santa Clara”. The pot offered by Two Ravens Pottery is beautifully polished and in very good condition.

                                                  Dawn Navasi Dawn Navasi

                                                  Dawn, “Polaquimana” (Red Tail Hawk), member of the Water Clan, was born into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation in 1961. She was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making from her extremely famous Mother, the late Eunice “Fawn” Navasie. Dawn specializes in handmade, traditional Hopi style pottery. She prefers making larger pots because they have more room for her to paint her favorite designs of mythical rain birds and rain clouds. She also paints moths, weather symbols, and elements of the earth. Natural minerals and vegetables like wild bee plant, hematite, and red clay are used for coloration. Firing is done in the traditional manner using sheep dung as fuel. Dawn signs her pottery as: Dawn Navasie followed by a water symbol to denote her clan origin.

                                                  Awards: 1st Gallup Ceremonial; 1st Hopi Guild; 1st Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ.

                                                  Publications: Arizona Highways, 1996; Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies, Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Treasures of the Hopi, Theda Bassman; Art of the Hopi, Contemporary Journeys on Ancient Pathways, Jerry and Lois Essary Jacka.

                                                    Frog Woman (Joy Navasie) Frog Woman (Joy Navasie)

                                                    Joy is the second Frog Woman. Her mother, Paqua , was the first. Joy began making pottery in her teenage years in 1935. She began signing with the frog in 1939. Paqua, just a few years before she passed away, developed the white ware pottery style that Joy and her daughters have continued to produce. Joy signs her pottery with a frog hallmark, as did her mother. There is a difference in the way they each drew the feet of the frog. Paqua used short straight toes and Joy uses web feet. Joy learned the “old ways” of pottery making from her mother. Joy would gather clay, clean, mold and coil the pottery. The slipping, polishing and painting and finally the outdoor firing were all done in the traditional way.

                                                    Publications: Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies), Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                                    Museums: Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ, Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ.

                                                    White Swan (Dolly Joe Navasie) White Swan (Dolly Joe Navasie)

                                                    White Swan is an acclaimed Hopi Potter of the Water Clan who grew up in the Antelope Mesa area of the Hopi Reservation. She learned the art of pottery making at an early age by watching her Mother, Fawn Navasie. Her clay is hand dug and processed. The pottery is coiled the traditional way and fired outdoors with sheep dung. She uses yucca to make her paint brushes for painting her intricate designs. Iron oxide rock is used for the maroon coloration, whereas the yellow clay provides the orange finish. She uses a polishing stone to polish her pottery that was passed down to her from Poli-ini (grandmother).

                                                    Awards: In 2003 she was distinguished as the recipient of the SWAIA’s prestigious fellowship award; 3rd San Bernardino Art Show 1984; 1st Museum of Northern Arizona “Hopi Show 1984, 3rd 1994, 3rd 1998, Hopi Tu-tsootsvolla, Sedona, AZ 3rd 1994, 3rd 1997, 1st and 2nd Best Traditional Pottery 1997; Best of Show (1995) and 1st 1996.

                                                    Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery, Rick Dillingham; Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies, Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Art of the Hopi, Contemporary Journeys on Ancient Pathways, Jerry and Lois Essary Jacka; American Indian Art Magazine , Spring 1996 .

                                                      Seferina Ortiz Seferina Ortiz

                                                      Serafina from Cochiti Pueblo, Oak Clan, is a potter who has been active since the 1950’s. Laurencita Herrera, her mother, was also her teacher. Serafina is one of the important matriarchs of Cochiti figural pottery. Her pottery and storytellers put her among the most pre-eminent of all potters. This is confirmed by the fact that she is the most highly represented Pueblo potter in The Wright Collection of the Peabody Museum at Harvard University which has 32 of her pieces. In addition to the Peabody Museum her work is highly sought after by collectors and galleries alike.

                                                      Awards: Numerous awards beginning in 1968 including Santa Fe Indian Market and the New Mexico State.

                                                      Publications: Among others, Southern Pueblo Pottery; by Gregory Schaaf, Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007), and Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom.

                                                      Gabriel Paloma Gabriel Paloma

                                                      Gabe took his first pottery class at Zuni High School in 1979. He has continued making pottery to the present time. He became the pottery ceramics teacher at Zuni High School in 1992, when he replaced well known Zuni potter, Noreen Simplicio. His pottery is influenced by earlier Zuni pottery in both form and design. Pottery made by Gabriel can be found in the Smithsonian Museum and the Heard Museum. Among his many students, two, Lynette Besselente (one of the youngest potters at Zuni) and Claudine Haloo, have received acclaim as accomplished potters.

                                                      Awards: Curator awards, 1st, 2nd and 3rd awards at the Museum of Northern Arizona and the Inter-tribal Ceremonial.

                                                      Publications: The Pottery of Zuni Pueblo by Dwight Lanmon and Francis Harlow; Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007).

                                                        Reyes Pino Reyes Pino

                                                        Reyes Pino Medina was born in the 1950’s and has been making pottery since the 70’s. She is a member of the Coyote Clan. She is the granddaughter of Joe Pino & Ascencion Galvan Pino, daughter of Laura Pino and the sister of Eleanor Pino – Griego & Ruby Panana. She was taught by her grandmother and mother. She specializes in traditional polychrome ollas, jars, bowls and pitchers. Publications: Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom; Southern Pueblo Pottery, by Gregory Schaaf; Singing the clay: Pueblo pottery of the Southwest, yesterday and today, by Bill Mercer.

                                                        Ulysses Reid Ulysses Reid

                                                        Ulysses, a potter from Zia Pueblo, spent a number of years dedicating himself to his tribe by working for the Pueblo of Zia language and cultural preservation program. While working for the Pueblo, Ulysses coordinated several community pottery projects with expert potter Lois Medina. It was during these programs that he learned the locations of mineral paints and clays.
                                                        His formal training as a potter started in 2004 when he was awarded a Folk Art Apprenticeship Grant from the New Mexico Arts to work with his mentor Rufina Panana. In a very short amount of time, Ulysses became known for his work with Zia and Mesa Verde pottery designs.

                                                        At the Indian Arts Research Center, Ulysses embarked on a very personal journey by working closely with the IARC’s Henate Collection. The collection consists of almost 200 pottery design sketches by Andres Galvan. Ulysses, who is Galvan’s grandson, will be producing pottery and using the sketches in honor of his grandfather.
                                                        Ulysses has shown at several art shows such as the Santa Fe Indian Market and Native Treasures Indian Arts Festival. He also currently serves on the advisory boards of the New Mexico Historical Records and the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture. Awards: Second Santa Fe Indian Market 2010.

                                                        Donna Robertson Donna Robertson

                                                        Donna Navasie-Robertson, “Parrot Girl”, is a Hopi-Tewa potter born in 1972. Donna was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by her Mother, Marianne Navasie. She has been an active potter since 1990 working with black and red on white. She is the granddaughter of Joy Navasie (second Frog Woman, Yellow Flower). Donna specializes in hand coiling the white slip Hopi pottery which her great grandmother is credited for originating. Donna gathers all of the materials used on her pottery from within the Hopi Reservation. She cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, sands, paints, polishes, and fires her pottery outdoors, the traditional way with sheep dung. All the colors that she uses on the pottery are extracted from minerals and plant life. She is from a family which has a very rich Hopi-Tewa tradition of creating fine pottery. Donna’s pots have the frog signature with tadpole and her initials, D.R.

                                                        Awards: Gallup Ceremonial 2nd Place, New Mexico State Fair 1st Place.

                                                        Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery by Rick Dillingham; Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artist Biographies by Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                                        Dee Setalla Dee Setalla

                                                        Dee is a member of the Hopi-Tewa Reservation. He was born and raised in Snowbird Canyon Arizona, and is a member of the Bear Clan. Dee began experimenting with pottery at the age of 6. Dee learned to make pottery from his Mother, Pauline Setalla, and his Aunt, Eunice, ” Fawn “, Navasie, both well known Hopi potters. They taught him all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way. Dee specializes in handmade traditional Hopi pottery. He gathers all his materials from within the Hopi Reservation. Dee paints traditional designs of birds, moths, butterflies, bear claws, clouds, and rain on his pottery. Natural pigments found within the Hopi Reservation also provide the colors used on his pottery. Dee uses the walpi polychrome yellow and beige with blushes, characteristic of Hopi pottery. Dee signs his pottery as: D.S., Hopi, followed by a bear paw symbol to denote his Clan origin. Dee’s fine pottery has appeared in numerous exhibitions throughout the Southwest.

                                                        Awards : 1 st Santa Fe Indian Market 1997; 3 rd Museum of Northern Arizona Hopi Show; 1998 Honorable Mention 1998 Santa Fe Indian Market; 1998 Merit Award, “Rez Art Show” Scottsdale Community College, Scottsdale, AZ; Blue Ribbon, Tuhisma 2007, Hopi Market Arts and Crafts Show.

                                                        Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery , Rick Dillingham; Hopi -Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies, Dr. Gregory Schaff.

                                                          Pauline Navasie Setalla Pauline Navasie Setalla

                                                          Pauline, a Hopi potter, was born in 1930 and has been making pottery for over 40 years. She was raised in a Hopi village called Mishongnovi, in Second Mesa, AZ. She was taught by two well known potters, her mother in law, Agnes Navasie and her sister in law, Eunice “Fawn” Navasie. Pauline uses only traditional methods in making her pottery. The clay she uses is obtained from the land she lives on. The pots are molded through the skilled use of coils. The exterior is painted with natural colors that come from native Beeweed and Mustard weed plants. After being polished, the pot is carefully fired outdoors with sheep dung. Pauline signs her pottery showing a bear claw. She is a member of the Bear Clan. Publications: “Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery” by Rick Dillingham. One of the pieces offered by Two Ravens Pottery appears to be from 1966. Unfortunately someone attempted to remove the sticker and pulled away some of the slip on the bottom. Use a product such as goo gone when removing stickers to prevent pulling slip away from the pot.

                                                          Jofern Puffer Silas Jofern Puffer Silas

                                                          Sharon Stevens Sharon Stevens

                                                          Sharon is Acoma, Bear Clan, and has been an active potter since about 1973. She is known for her large Anasazi Revival storage jars such as the one offered by Two Ravens Pottery. She enjoys making larger pottery because she is able to be more creative in her designs. She paints her pottery with a yucca brush using traditional paints.

                                                          Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Potter, Rick Dillingham; Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery and Directory of Artists, Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer; Southern Pueblo Pottery: 2000 Artist Biographies, by Dr. Gregory Schaaf. She signs her pottery S. or S.L. Stevens with a Bear Paw hallmark, Acoma, NM.

                                                          Ada Suina Ada Suina

                                                          Ada is Cochiti, Fox Clan and has been an active potter from 1973 to the present. Unfortunately, like almost all Cochiti potters she no longer has access to the white slip that is a hallmark of Cochiti pottery and figures. Ada is well known for her Singing Mothers and Storytellers. Born in 1930, she made her first storyteller in 1976, “…her figures are distinguished by their extremely fine workmanship, large and distinctive faces, and the addition of an unusual orange or apricot to the traditional polychrome.” Babcock, The Cochiti Storyteller, 1986; Ada is referred to and featured in that book as often as any other artist with a wonderful example illustrated as color Plate 8.

                                                          Awards: 1976, 2nd, 1979 1st, 1980 1st, 1981 2nd, 1983 1st, 1984 John R. Bott Award, Best Cochiti Storyteller, 1991 1st, 2nd, 1992, 2nd, 1993 1st Figures; 1994 John R. Bott Award, Best Cochiti Storyteller, 1995 1st Figures; 1996 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 1999 1st Indian Market Santa Fe; Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial, Gallup, NM; New Mexico State Fair, Albuquerque.

                                                          Galleries: Andrea Fisher, Hoel’s Indian Shop, Adobe Gallery, Andrew Pueblo Pottery and Art Gallery.

                                                          Publications: Arizona Highways Indian Arts and Crafts, Clara Tanner (1976); SWAIA Quarterly, Fall 1976; Fall 1982; American Indian Pottery, John W. Barry (1984); The Pueblo Story Teller, Barbara Babcock (1986); Talking With The Clay, Stephen Trimble (1997) and (2007); Pueblo & Navajo Contemporary Pottery, Berger & Schiffer (2000); Southern Pueblo Pottery 2000 Artist Biographies , Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                                            Camilio Tafoya

                                                            Camilio Tafoya was a brother of Margaret Tafoya and Christina Naranjo , and also the father of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf .  Camilio began making pottery in the mid-1920’s. He made larger, carved vessels in the 1950’s, and in the 1970’s, was among the first to begin etching designs into the clay, using the “sgraffito” process.  The incised Avanyu design is a bit cruder than his later pottery, but certainly a reflection of the earlier time period for this particular piece.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Camilio Tafoya”.  This piece is in very good condition.

                                                            Publications: Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery, Rick Dillingham @pp. 204-205.

                                                            Sarah Ann Tafoya Sarah Ann Tafoya

                                                            Mark Tahbo Mark Tahbo

                                                            Mark is one of the top Hopi potters of today. He grew up in Polacca, the Hopi village just below First Mesa, on the Hopi Reservation. He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, the late Grace Chapella. He now lives on the outskirts of Polacca an area which is filled with pottery shards from the prehistoric ruins of Sikyatki.at ancient civilization. He says that the shards give him ideas and inspirations. Technically, Mark’s pottery is classified as “Sikyatki Revival Ware.” Mark makes all of his pieces by classic, traditional methods–digs and prepares the local clays, coils and polishes the pots, uses natural pigments for his paint. His pottery is known for the black and red on yellow jars or pots.

                                                            Awards: First Place and Overall Prize, SWAIA Indian Market, 1991, Best of Division, 34 th Annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, 1992, Third Place Indian Market, 1992, First and Third Place Indian Market, 1993, Best of Division, Judge’s Choice Award, 40 th Annual Indian Fair and Market, Heard Museum.

                                                            Publications: Hopi-Tewa Pottery, 500 Artist Biographies); Dr . Gregory Schaaf; Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery, Rick Dillingham; Art of the Hopi Jerry and Lois Jacka; Southwestern Pottery, Allan Hayes & John Blom.

                                                              Robert Tenorio Robert Tenorio

                                                              Robert Tenorio was born in 1950 into the Santo Domingo “Kewa” Pueblo. He has been working with clay since the age of 10. He was taught all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using ancient traditional methods from his family members. Lupe Tenorio shared some of her special techniques with Robert. He was also inspired to continue the long lived family tradition from the admiration he had for old pottery from his village. Robert is truly one of the greatest Santo Domingo potters of any generation. Robert specializes in hand coiled, traditional Santo Domingo pottery. He gathers his clay and other natural pigments from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. Then, he soaks the clay, cleans, sifts, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, paints, and fires his pottery outdoors, using cottonwood bark. The colors he uses to paint his pottery with are basically derived from native plants also hand picked by Robert, which are boiled together to make the paint to complete his masterpieces. He hand coils many shapes and sizes of pottery like water vessels, dough bowls, and traditional pots. Robert is continuously experimenting with different types of plants in hopes of making the special black color which was used as the pigment on pottery several hundred years ago. He signs his pottery as: Robert Tenorio followed by a small dipper star formation, and Kewa. He is related to: Paulita Pacheco (sister), Gilbert Pacheco (brother-in-law), Hilda Coriz (sister), Ione Coriz (niece), and Juanita Tenorio (mother).
                                                              Robert’s pottery began winning awards in 1967. He received two First Place Awards at the 2004 Santa Fe Indian Market. He has received awards for pottery entered in the Heard Museum Show, Eight Northern Pueblos as well as other shows. In 2003, he placed first at the Eight Northern Pueblo Arts & Crafts Show. Awards keep coming his way.

                                                              Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom; Hopi-Tewa Pottery: 500 Artist Biographies by Dr. Gregory Schaaf; Southern Pueblo Pottery: 2000 Artist Biographies, by Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                                              Thomas Tenorio Thomas Tenorio

                                                              Thomas was given the Indian name of “U-Nah-Thee-Wah” when he was born into the Pueblo of Santo Domingo in 1963. Thomas, a self taught potter, gathers all of his natural pigments from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. He cleans, hand mixes, hand coils, and shapes his pottery. One of his unique techniques is firing his larger pieces in a special kiln similar to a bread oven. He has been an active potter since 1972. Thomas has two main styles of pottery. One is the traditional Santo Domingo style of the 1880’s to 1920’s. The other is traditional black on redware with carved outlines. His favorite designs include flowers, clouds, vines, and traditional Santo Domingo bird image.

                                                              Awards: 1996 1st, 1997 2nd; 1998 1st, 2nd; 1999 2nd New Mexico State Fair, Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial, 2nd Santa Fe Indian Market 2008. He has also been in shows in Texas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and New York. Publications: Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble (2007); Southwestern Pottery, by Allan Hayes & John Blom; Southern Pueblo Pottery: 2000 Artist Biographies, by Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                                                Katherine Victorino Katherine Victorino

                                                                Katherine from Acoma was born in 1968 and has been making pottery since she was 16. She is a member of the Yellow Corn / Baby Parrott Clan. She was taught by her stepmother Beverly Garcia Victorino. Katherine is an exceptional painter and specializes in fine line designs. She uses all natural materials for her paints. Katherine’s family members are very active Acoma potters who are known for the fine line pottery they produce. She signs her pottery K. Victorino.

                                                                  Monroe Victorino Monroe Victorino

                                                                  Monroe was born May 18, 1940 and has been an active Acoma potter from 1977 to present. He is known for his traditional fine line & polychrome jars and bowls. He paints his superb fine line pottery with a yucca brush he makes. He signs his pottery “Victorino”.

                                                                  Publications: Southern Pueblo Pottery by Berger & Schiffer; Southern Pueblo Pottery: 2000 Artist Biographies, by Dr. Gregory Schaaf.

                                                                    Michelle Williams Michelle Williams

                                                                    Navajo Potter. Michelle learned to make pottery from her grandmother, Rose Williams, who is considered the matriarch of modern Navajo potters, and her mother Alice Cling. Both her grandmother and mother are renowned potters. Michelle has been making fine pottery since the early 1990’s. Michelle’s pieces are entirely hand-made, from digging and preparing the clay to hand constructing the pot, and finally to firing it in a wood fire. Each piece is then coated with a thin veneer of melted pine pitch, enhancing the color variations that result naturally from the firing. Michelle was born in Tuba City, AZ and is a member of the Reed People and Towering House clans of the Navajo Tribe. One of the beautiful pots offered by Two Ravens Pottery was made by Michelle, but has some scratches. That is the reason for the price on that piece. See a wonderful interview of Michelle by Steve Simpson from Twin Rocks Trading Post HYPERLINK.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjjpGvo9gng

                                                                    Marcella Yepa Marcella Yepa